Max Scheler’s Concept of the Person: An Ethics of Humanism


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Abstract Max Ferdinand Scheler — was born in Munich. Related Information. Close Figure Viewer. Browse All Figures Return to Figure. Previous Figure Next Figure. Email or Customer ID. Forgot password? Old Password. New Password.


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Password Changed Successfully Your password has been changed. Returning user. Request Username Can't sign in? Forgot your username? Enter your email address below and we will send you your username. Forgot your password? The showy flowers, only apparent for such a short period of the year, are only the tip of the iceberg. Its hidden subsoil rhizomes are also intimately conjoined, in ways that are poorly understood, with very specific taxonomical groups of mycorrhizal fungi.

The adult plant too may continue to be dependent on fungal-produced resources. This in turn might suggest that there is also something special about the composition of the microscopic soil community in this place where Cypripedium calceolus retains its fragile foothold. Ethics flows through the landscape as we attend to it. What had been, perhaps, a rather uninteresting rocky slope begins to take on new significance as we become open to wider possibilities of other aspects of this place and other members of this community appear in our world.

Crossing the ground before us a mole pushes its difficult way through the shallow earth: turning over a rock insects and centipedes scuttle for cover through white tangles of plant roots never before exposed to direct sunlight. And although so many of the entities that compose the soil beneath us remain invisible and non-individuated, in attending to what does appear we also intuit something of the inter-connected multitudes that continually escape our purview.

An ecological ethics concerns itself with the ways in which the Earth shows itself as what it holds in reserve , with the way in which the sur-face of the soil is also an indication of its hidden depths and its un-explicated associations. Indeed the living ecological community might be understood phenomenologically as composed of irreducible mutual appearances between various beings, each to the others Smith, Against Ecological Sovereignty.

The ecology of ethics lies precisely in not isolating individuals from this background as intentional objects or as members of formal categories, but in appreciating the not entirely comprehensible ways in which these individuals also constitute a part of a community of myriad beings which appear to each other in all kinds of ways, as commensual, as mutualistic, as parasite, as prey, as resources, as co-evolved and evolving beings. As and when we concern ourselves with these communities and attend to some of these inter-connections we open different ethical possibilities.

Rather, part of what it is to be a living being capable of ethical feelings and valuations is to be able to hold these felt values in reserve, releasing them in the face of certain often unexpected events , the origins of which we can never fully comprehend.

And these events if ethical are never limited only to what appears as an intentional object. They realize something of the depth behind what faces us and simultaneously open possibilities for ethics to overflow along these hermeneutically and ecologically informed, but only partly pre-figured channels as and when our active involvement, our concerned attention, our love for the world comes to the surface as Others appear and disappear.

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Attending to the natural world we come to realize that ecology matters. And an ecological ethics recognises that it matters even if it cannot always explicate how and why it matters. And what could matter more than the life-sustaining earth itself? What appears to us is not all that appears.

Max Scheler's Concept of the Person: An Ethics of Humanism

What has significance in its appearance to us inevitably has different significance to others and a significance that overflows to Others. What appears in this world is not all there is to the Earth. Many entities, some very unlike humans, have such interests. In its positive ethical aspect, fellow feeling too develops further into what Scheler considers the still higher form of Christian love. By contrast, for Levinas ethics initially precedes any possibility of self-concern whatsoever, since self-awareness awareness of oneself as a self only comes through prior experience of the Other.

Works Cited Barber, Michael D. Lewisburg: Bucknell UP, Callicott, J. Clark, David.

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Barbara Gabriel and Suzan Ilcan. Derrida, Jacques. Eduardo Cadavera. London: Routledge, Fitter, A. Goodpaster, Kenneth. Haar, Michel.

Max Scheler, Formalism in Ethics and Non-Formal Ethics of Values

Bloomington: Indiana UP, San Francisco: North Point Press, Johnson, Lawrence E. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, Leopold, Aldo. Oxford: Oxford UP, Llewelyn, John. Humanism of the Other Animal. Robert Bernasconi and Simon Critchley. New York: St. Ramsey, Margaret M.


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Shefferson, Richard P. Lee Taylors. Scheler, Max. Chicago: U of Chicago P, Evanston: Northwestern UP. Schneck, Stephen Frederick. Singer, Peter. The Expanding Circle: Ethics and Sociobiology. Oxford: Clarendon Press, Smith, Mick. Claire Schiller. New York: International Universities P, Wood, David.

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Max Scheler’s Concept of the Person: An Ethics of Humanism Max Scheler’s Concept of the Person: An Ethics of Humanism
Max Scheler’s Concept of the Person: An Ethics of Humanism Max Scheler’s Concept of the Person: An Ethics of Humanism
Max Scheler’s Concept of the Person: An Ethics of Humanism Max Scheler’s Concept of the Person: An Ethics of Humanism
Max Scheler’s Concept of the Person: An Ethics of Humanism Max Scheler’s Concept of the Person: An Ethics of Humanism
Max Scheler’s Concept of the Person: An Ethics of Humanism Max Scheler’s Concept of the Person: An Ethics of Humanism
Max Scheler’s Concept of the Person: An Ethics of Humanism Max Scheler’s Concept of the Person: An Ethics of Humanism
Max Scheler’s Concept of the Person: An Ethics of Humanism Max Scheler’s Concept of the Person: An Ethics of Humanism
Max Scheler’s Concept of the Person: An Ethics of Humanism Max Scheler’s Concept of the Person: An Ethics of Humanism

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